Just Say It Already...

About   

Wherein I report the best things that get said that I can find.

August 21, 2014 at 9:00am
0 notes

I don’t believe in writer’s block. I don’t even think it exists. What you have to do is just pick up a pen and physically write. What happens is that people get lost in their minds and their ideas. I developed my approach over many years. I was practicing Zen, sitting meditation for long hours, and Katagiri Roshi [her teacher] said, “Why don’t you make writing your practice?” Before that, I knew I couldn’t learn how to do writing in school, because people didn’t know how to teach it. So I had to figure it out on my own. What are the tools of the writer but pen, paper, and the human mind? Where do thoughts come from? Where’s memory? Where’s past? I just worked with the human mind, and I figured out if you keep your hand moving, something will come out.

— Natalie Goldberg: “I Don’t Believe in Writer’s Block” | Talking Writing

August 20, 2014 at 7:30pm
163 notes
Reblogged from explore-blog
explore-blog:

Rebecca Solnit on distance and desire

explore-blog:

Rebecca Solnit on distance and desire

August 11, 2014 at 5:12am
0 notes

I’ve heard it said that every day you need half an hour of quiet time for yourself, or your Self, unless you’re incredibly busy and stressed, in which case you need an hour. I promise you, it is there. Fight tooth and nail to find time, to make it. It is our true wealth, this moment, this hour, this day.

— Time lost and found

5:12am
0 notes

You already have the gold coins beneath you, of presence, creativity, intimacy, time for wonder, and nature, and life. Oh, yeah, you say? And where would those rascally coins be?

This is what I say: First of all, no one needs to watch the news every night, unless one is married to the anchor. Otherwise, you are mostly going to learn more than you need to know about where the local fires are, and how rainy it has been: so rainy! That is half an hour, a few days a week, I tell my students. You could commit to writing one page a night, which, over a year, is most of a book.

— Time lost and found

4:56am
0 notes

Taking breaks is biologically restorative. Naps are even better. In several studies, a nap of even 10 minutes improved cognitive function and vigor, and decreased sleepiness and fatigue. If we can train ourselves to take regular vacations — true vacations without work — and to set aside time for naps and contemplation, we will be in a more powerful position to start solving some of the world’s big problems. And to be happier and well rested while we’re doing it.

— Hit the Reset Button in Your Brain

4:56am
0 notes

Increasing creativity will happen naturally as we tame the multitasking and immerse ourselves in a single task for sustained periods of, say, 30 to 50 minutes. Several studies have shown that a walk in nature or listening to music can trigger the mind-wandering mode. This acts as a neural reset button, and provides much needed perspective on what you’re doing.

Daydreaming leads to creativity, and creative activities teach us agency, the ability to change the world, to mold it to our liking, to have a positive effect on our environment. Music, for example, turns out to be an effective method for improving attention, building up self-confidence, social skills and a sense of engagement.

— Hit the Reset Button in Your Brain

4:55am
0 notes

If you want to be more productive and creative, and to have more energy, the science dictates that you should partition your day into project periods. Your social networking should be done during a designated time, not as constant interruptions to your day.

Email, too, should be done at designated times. An email that you know is sitting there, unread, may sap attentional resources as your brain keeps thinking about it, distracting you from what you’re doing. What might be in it? Who’s it from? Is it good news or bad news? It’s better to leave your email program off than to hear that constant ping and know that you’re ignoring messages.

— Hit the Reset Button in Your Brain

4:54am
0 notes

Every status update you read on Facebook, every tweet or text message you get from a friend, is competing for resources in your brain with important things like whether to put your savings in stocks or bonds, where you left your passport or how best to reconcile with a close friend you just had an argument with.

— Hit the Reset Button in Your Brain

August 5, 2014 at 2:01pm
0 notes

I sometimes teach classes on writing, during which I tell my students every single thing I know about the craft and habit. This takes approximately 45 minutes.

— Finding time - Sunset

1:20pm
0 notes

We have argued that unskilled individuals suffer a dual burden: Not only do they perform poorly, but they fail to realize it. It thus appears that extremely competent individuals suffer a burden as well. Although they perform competently, they fail to realize that their proficiency is not necessarily shared by their peers.

— Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties in Recognizing One’s Own Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments